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What do you think should be at the heart of positive psychology – is it the notion of flourishing, or something else?

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Choose one of the topics listed below. Make sure to write which topic you have chosen at the top of the first page (e.g., “Topic 2”). For this paper you must use at least 2 academic articles from the syllabus (sources are given below) and third source from the syllabus, which could be an additional article, lecture, or video. (Due to paper #1, neither The Brain That Changes Itself nor “The Brain with David Eagleman” will count towards these three sources, but can be used in addition.)
TOPIC 1 — How can positive psychology further advance a field of interest (or the career you are advancing, such as healthcare), or a need in society (such as nourishing our green environment), or a need in the world (such as positive peacekeeping in the Middle East)? A shortcut to this topic is: “Considering positive psychology’s aim to enhance human flourishing worldwide, how can the field make a significant impact on promoting healthy environments and institutions?” We want you to think big and dream, using empirically-based constructs of positive psychology to support your vision. An example: “‘Green’ is a buzzword. Individuals, homes, businesses, and communities are working to support environmentally friendly living. Positive psychology can help.” (And then describe the ways in which PERMA, and/or self-regulation, and/or goal-setting, etc. can support this effort). Since we have covered how positive psychology is advancing the
field of education in the work of Dweck, if you are going to discuss education please do not focus on her achievements.
TOPIC 2 — Create a unique, comprehensive model organizing the ideas of positive psychology. We are not asking you to restate the five areas we covered or to regurgitate things you have read, but to consider a different model for how positive psychology concepts go together and interact. What do you think should be at the heart of positive psychology – is it the notion of flourishing, or something else? Can you think of a new way to unify the components of positive psychology in a novel theoretical framework? A drawing or figure is very welcome. Make this something that you’re proud of.
Microsoft Word Doc is the mandated method of submission. Papers should be 4 – 5 pages in length with one-inch margins (side and top, we measure!), 12-point font, Times New Roman, double-spaced, with citations in APA style. The response papers will involve some degree of personal examination using the material from the class. It should not be a diary entry and it should not be a book report — introduction, thesis statement, support (with references), and conclusion. We will also expect you to proofread and we do nat went 2 c terrible grammar or spelling.
due on November 22nd
Sources (use at least 2 academic articles from below and third source from below, which could be an additional article, lecture, or video).
Haidt article
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, pages 3-12.
● Reilly, Katie. (2018). Record numbers of college students are seeking treatment for depression and anxiety– but schools can’t keep up. TIME.
● Peter Dahlgren (2018) Media, Knowledge and Trust: The Deepening Epistemic Crisis of
Democracy, Javnost – The Public, 25:1-2, 20-27, DOI: 10.1080/13183222.2018.1418819
● Gable, S. L. and J. Haidt (2005). “What (and why) is positive psychology?” Review of general
psychology 9(2): 103-110.
● Rowan, A. N. (2022). World Happiness Report 2022. WellBeing News, 4(3), 2022. Pages 107-110
● Jebb, A., Tay, L., Diener, E., & Oishi, S. (2018). Happiness, income satiation, and turning points around the world. Nature International Journal of Science.
● Chapter 5. Helliwell, J. F., Huang, H., & Wang, S. (2019). World happiness report, 2019. Recommended Viewing
● Epicurus on Happiness: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irornIAQzQY
● Chotpitayasunondh, Varoth. (2018). The effects of “phubbing” on social interaction. Journal
of Applied Social Psychology. Read ONLY sections 1, 4, and 5.
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 2.
● Peer Effects, Diversity, and College Roommates in the United States: The Abdul Latif Jameel
Poverty Action Lab. (n.d.).
● Marazziti, D., Palermo, S., & Mucci, F. (2021). The Science of Love: State of the Art. Recent Advances in NGF and Related Molecules, 249-254
Recommended Viewing (please choose ONE from the list below):
● Film: Lilo & Stitch
● Film: Out
● Film: Up
● Film: Good Will Hunting
● Film: The Big Sick
● Fredrickson, B., Mancuso, Branigan, & Tugade. (2000). The undoing effect of positive
emotions. Motivation and Emotion 24(4), 237-258.
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 1.
● Keltner, D., & Cowen, A. (2021). A taxonomy of positive emotions. Current Opinion in
Behavioral Sciences, 39, 216-221.
● https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24g8IzFCOMM
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 3.
● Niemiec, R. M. (2013). VIA character strengths: Research and practice (The first 10 years). In
H.H. Knoop & A. Delle Fave (Eds.), Well-being and cultures: Perspectives on positive
psychology (pp. 11-30). New York: Springer. Read the whole article.
● Peterson, C., & Seligman, M.E.P. (2004). Character strengths and virtues: A handbook and
classification. New York: Oxford University Press. Entire book is available as PDF on Bobcat. Please read JUST ONE CHAPTER that discusses one of your top three strengths as ranked by the VIA-IS assessment results (choose whichever you feel fits you best).
● Dweck, C. Messages that motivate, pages 37-60.
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, pages 73 – 77 and Chapter 4.
● TED — Dan Gilbert on happiness:
www.ted.com/talks/dan_gilbert_asks_why_are_we_happy.html
● Baumeister, R., & Tierney, J. (2012). Willpower: Rediscovering the greatest human strength,
chapters 2 & 10.
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 6.
Required Viewing
● Tim Urban’s Ted Talk—Inside the mind of a master procrastinator

● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 7.
● Lerner, J. S., Li, Y., Valdesolo, P., & Kassam, K. S. (2015). Emotion and decision
making. Annual review of psychology, 66(1).
● Eisenberg, D., Downs, M., Golberstein, E., Zivin, K. (2009). Stigma and help seeking for
mental health among college students. Medical Care Research and Review, 66(5), 522-541. only pages 1 – 7 ending at “Statistical Analysis,” pick up with “Discussion” pages 13 – 17.
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 9.
● Carr, A., Cullen, K., Keeney, C., Canning, C., Mooney, O., Chinseallaigh, E., & O’Dowd, A.
(2021). Effectiveness of positive psychology interventions: a systematic review and meta-
analysis. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 16(6), 749-769. (only read intro and conclusion)
● Film: The Matrix
● Film: The Squid and The Whale
● https://www.talkspace.com/blog/2015/07/top-20-movies-with-a-therapy-focus-from-talkspace/
● Hofmann, S. G., Sawyer, A. T., & Fang, A. (2010). The empirical status of the “new wave” of cognitive behavioral therapy. Psychiatric Clinics, 33(3), 701-710.
● Film: The Shawshank Redemption
● Lejuez, Carl W., Derek R. Hopko, and Sandra D. Hopko. “A brief behavioral activation treatment for depression: Treatment manual.” Behavior Modification 25.2 (2001): 255-286. (start at the top of the third page and stop at the summary and conclusion)
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 5.
● Wang, G., Wang, Y., & Gai, X. (2021). A meta-analysis of the effects of mental contrasting
with implementation intentions on goal attainment. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 565202.
● Hecht, D. (2013). “The neural basis of optimism and pessimism.” Experimental neurobiology 22(3): 173.
• Film: The King’s Speech
• Film: Hidden Figures
• Film: Life is Beautiful*
• Film: The Martian
• Film: Precious*
• Film: Finding Nemo
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 10.
● Ratey, J. J., & Loehr, J. E. (2011). The positive impact of physical activity on cognition during adulthood: A review underlying mechanisms, evidence, and recommendations. Reviews in the Neurosciences 22(2), pages 171-185.
● Dos Santos, M., Ferrari, G., Lee, D. H., Rey-López, J. P., Aune, D., Liao, B., … & Rezende, L.
F. (2022). Association of the “Weekend Warrior” and Other Leisure-time Physical Activity
Patterns With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality: A Nationwide Cohort Study. JAMA
Internal Medicine, 182(8), 840-848. (only read intro and conclusion)
● TED — Stuart Brown on Play:
www.ted.com/talks/stuart_brown_says_play_is_more_than_fun_it_s_vital
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, pages 181-183 and Chapter 11.
● Rozin, P. Food is fundamental, fun, frightening, and far-reaching. Social Research; Spring
1999; 66, 1; ProQuest, pages 9-28.
● Hadhazy, A. (2010). Think twice: How the gut’s “second brain” influences mood and well-
being. Scientific American, 12, 2010.
● Greenwood, V. (2018, January 03). Why Do We Need to Sleep?
● Hamblin, J. (2016, December 14). How to Sleep.
● Lerner, D., & Schlechter, A. (2017). U Thrive, Chapter 12.
● Kulze, L. (2013). How Meditation works. The Atlantic.
● Zenner, C., Herrnleben-Kurz S., & Walach, H. (2014). Mindfulness-based interventions in
schools—a systematic review and meta-analysis. Frontiers. (read intro and conclusion)
● Rogers, H. B. (2013). Mindfulness meditation for increasing resilience in college
students. Psychiatric Annals, 43(12), 545-548.

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