Categories
Sociology

How do all these changes affect the daily lives of both the aging individual and those with whom she or he interacts (or might interact)?

Looking for some help? We have it all. Great price and impressive quality

For This or a Similar Paper Click To Order

This assignment is the fourth of five original topical essays you are to write and post on the Discussion Board—and which I will be using (in lieu of exams) to assess your mastery of course material. When posting, type or paste directly into the Messages box so that your readers will not have to open attached files (use attachments only for supplementary materials such as photos). In this essay, you are to discuss the following:
(1) What are some of the major SOCIAL implications of biological changes (e.g., declines in vision, hearing, and mobility) that come with aging?
(2) Aging can also alter mental functions such as learning and memory. How do all these changes affect the daily lives of both the aging individual and those with whom she or he interacts (or might interact)?
(3) Also consider dangerous risk factors associated with hospital stays in older people, and effective ways of guarding against these risks.
(4) Finally, describe in detail one or two real (or true-to-life hypothetical) case examples of older adults who are either struggling with or coping well with the physical and mental challenges they face.
(5) What can people do to help maintain their faculties as they age?
RESPONDING TO THIS RESPONSE SEE BELLOW NEEDS TO BE 300 WORDS OR MORE:
Human aging is a physiological process that changes over time. According to the majority of gerontologists, it begins in the fourth decade of your life and results in death. Human aging is a complex, individualized process that affects one’s biological, psychological, and social well-being. Age-related changes in metabolic and physical properties of cells, which hinder self-regulation and regeneration and result in radical reforms and functional organs and tissues are the hallmarks of biological aging. It is a normal, irreversible process that might manifest as healthy aging, ordinary aging, or pathological aging. Age related biological changes in the human body impact mood, attitude toward the environment, physical health, and social activities. These changes also define seniors’ roles in families and society. Psychological aging is the consciousness of a person and his capacity to adjust to aging. Among adoption attitudes, we can distinguish between those that are positive, dependent, antagonistic toward others, and self-centered. Age-related changes in the cognitive and intellectual realm, involution of the perceptual process, reduction of observed sensations and information acquired, and changes in thinking processes are all symptoms of difficulty adapting to new situations. Social aging is strictly defined as the function of the elderly, which is culturally conditioned and subject to change as customs do. Social aging is the perception of the aging process by an individual and by society.
As we age, biological changes undoubtedly take place. The earliest clues may be in the way we look. Our male hairlines start to regress, and a few wrinkles start to appear. Our hair starts to turn gray. The more significant changes that occur internally as we age include fat replaces body mass, but many people have gained weight bone and muscle loss, lungs lose their capacity to take in air, and our breathing efficiency declines, cardiovascular and renal system functions decline the number of neurological cells begins to decline, as does brain mass overall, and vision and hearing decline. There are also psychological and cognitive changes. After the age of 70, learning and memory start to deteriorate; depression and other psychological illnesses might develop; dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, can happen. Statistics from all of these illnesses include the following 60 percent of women in their 70s have osteoporosis, almost one-fifth have diabetes, nearly one-fifth have coronary heart disease, and about half of persons 65 and older have arthritis or high blood pressure.
Older patients who are admitted to the hospital deal with the stress of the underlying disease or injury as well as the trying hospital atmosphere. Hospitalization can result in geriatric syndromes, which are consequences that are not related to the presenting illness. Geriatric syndromes are illnesses that affect older persons more frequently, have a complex origin, common risk factors, and have a detrimental effect on patient outcomes. Numerous studies describing aging syndromes in hospitalized seniors mention pre-existing conditions like mobility limitations, a history of falls, and cognitive impairment. These are frequently incorporated in thorough geriatric assessments and have examination for older inpatients. The development of new problems during treatment, such as psychosis and completely new limitations, is discussed in other research.
To help maintain, people should focus on things like take care of their physical health, maintain blood pressure, eat right, be active in mind and body, stay up to date with social issues, and manage their stress levels.

Looking for some help? We have it all. Great price and impressive quality

For This or a Similar Paper Click To Order

Leave a Reply